2017 CUE Summer Educator Forum: Grades 6-12

Culturally Responsive Education in Grades 6-12

June 20-21 / 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Greenway Professional Development Center
1400 Crucible Street
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15205

Last June, we shared two days of learning and growing together around culturally responsive teaching at the Center for Urban Education Summer Educator Forum (CUESEF). With the aim of building on that work, we’re thrilled to invite you back this year for CUESEF 6-12, which will take place June 20-21. This forum will continue to strengthen educators' skills for culturally responsive instructional practices in ELA and math, and will feature workshops with Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz (ELA) and Ebony McGee (math). Light breakfast, lunch and complimentary books will be provided for all participating educators. Registration is $35 and on a first-come, first-served basis. We are developing a payment portal and will send out a link prior to the conference. Scholarships are available, as we don't want any educators to miss out on this valuable professional development opportunity. For scholarship information, contact Dr. Erika Gold Kestenberg.

We're offering 15 PA Act 48 credits for educators who complete a series of pre-conference readings and participate in the entire forum. 

Registration for CUESEF will close on June 16.

Register now!
 


Preconference Readings

In preparation for CUESEF, please read over the following materials, write out responses to the reflection questions below, and bring them to share your thoughts with your facilitator and other participants. Your responses are for your own reference — they will not be collected. We expect this exercise shouldn’t take you longer than one hour. These pre-forum readings and reflections are required for participants seeking Act 48 professional development credits, but optional for everyone else. You do not need to complete them in order to attend.

All educators seeking Act 48 credits should:

  1. Read the chapter written by Gloria Ladson-Billings (2011)
  2. Write out a response to the following reflection question:
  • Ladson-Billings argues that culturally relevant pedagogy is less about “what to do” and more about “how to be” in the classroom. What does she mean by this? 
     

ELA section participants seeking Act 48 credits should:

  1. Read the article by Jackson, Sealy-Ruiz & Watson (2014)
  2. Write out responses to the following reflection questions:
  • In what ways does the article, Reciprocal Love, cause you to reflect on your relationships with your students, specifically your male students of color?
  • What did you learn about yourself? Your practice? The ethos of the school where you teach? The classroom environment you've created for your students?

 

Math section participants seeking Act 48 credits should:

  1. Read the article by Ebony McGee (2015)
  2. Write out responses to the following reflection questions:
  • How can you facilitate the development of robust mathematical identities in your classroom?

  • What would be the main chapters in your life as a mathematics learner?   What would be the main chapters in your life as a mathematics teacher?  Provide titles and a brief summary for each.

  • How do your students negotiate different identities (race, gender, class, others) in different contexts?  How so?  How could you capitalize on these distinct identities to enhance learning in your classroom?

  • What can Rob and Tinesha’s parents teach us about mathematic aspirations? How can you incorporate this into your parental communication strategies?

  • What are the short-term and long-term effects of continually attempting to achieve in a STEM learning environment in which encountering racial obstacles is the norm?

  • How might mathematics teachers work within this framework to assist students of color in not becoming “stalled” in a fragile mathematical identity?


Featured Speakers


Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, Associate Professor of English Education at Teachers College, Columbia University

Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz's research interests include racial literacy development, Black and Latino male students, Black girl literacies, Black female college reentry, and Culturally Responsive Pedagogy. She is founder and faculty sponsor of Coumbia's Racial Literacy Roundtables Series, where for eight years, national scholars, doctoral, pre-service and in-service Master’s students, and young people in schools facilitate informal conversations around race and other issues of diversity in schools and society. Dr. Sealey-Ruiz is also a co-founder (with Laura Smith and Lalitha Vasudevan) of the Civic Participation Project at TC, a multi-disciplinary project that focuses on the well-being of youth involved in the foster care and the juvenile justice systems.

At Teachers College (TC) she is founder and faculty sponsor of the Racial Literacy Roundtables Series, where for eight years, national scholars, doctoral, pre-service and in-service Master’s students, and young people in schools facilitate informal conversations around race and other issues of diversity in schools and society. Dr. Sealey-Ruiz is also a co-founder (with Laura Smith and Lalitha Vasudevan) of the Civic Participation Project at TC, a multi-disciplinary project that focuses on the well-being of youth involved in the foster care and the juvenile justice systems.

Yolanda is the recipient of the 2016 American Educational Research Association's Mid-Career Award in Teacher and Teacher Education. She is the immediate-past secretary for AERA’s Division K, and a 2012-2013 Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. Yolanda’s work has appeared in several refereed journals including Adult Education Quarterly, English Education, Teachers College Record, Teaching English in a Two-Year College, The Journal of Negro Education, and Urban Education. She is co-editor of the book Teacher Education and Black Communities: Implications for Access, Equity, and Achievement.

Ebony McGee, Assistant Professor of Diversity and STEM Education at Peabody College, Vanderbilt University

Ebony McGee investigates what it means to “be Black,” “be Latinx,” or “be Asian” in the context of learning and achieving in STEM. In particular, she studies the racialized experiences and racial stereotypes affecting the experiences and outcomes for these groups. Her research also focuses on the effect of racialized experiences and bias on STEM education and career, exploring the costs of academic achievement and problematizing “success,” and how marginalization undercuts success in STEM in terms of psychological stress, interrupted STEM career trajectories, impostor phenomenon, and other problems.

McGee left a successful career in electrical engineering to earn a PhD in mathematics education from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the University of Chicago and a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University.

Funded by five National Science Foundation grants, McGee co-founded Explorations in Diversifying Engineering Faculty Initiative (EDEFI), whose mission is to investigate (1) the institutional, technical, social, and cultural factors that influence decision-making and career choices for Black engineering doctoral students and (2) how those factors contribute to the current underrepresentation of Black people in engineering faculty positions. McGee co-designed a holistic racial- and gender-specific online mentoring portal for PhD students and postdoctoral scholars with the goal of increasing the representation of engineering faculty of color. Her most recent line of research explores the persistence of engineering and computing faculty Women of Color in their departments and institutions through an intersectionality framework (race, gender, and class).